DIFFERENT SYSTEMS AND TERMS USED


DIRECT DRIVE CHAIN DRIVE CLUTCH DRIVE

DIRECT DRIVE

A direct drive system can be a chain driven system or friction drive system, how they work differs completely. Friction drive means engine rides on top of your tire.

A bicycle needs to be pedaled for some distance, (¼ of a block) to reach 15 m.p.h. before a lever can be engaged to compress the drive roller against the tire which starts up the motor, at the same time, twisting the gas throttle to accelerate so as to avoid the engine from stalling. 

Note: This is a crude method of starting the motor, since, it requires absolute balance,
leg and arm strengths, reflex and the ability to do all that at once without losing
control of the bicycle.

Furthermore, this balancing act is done each and every time one comes to a stop.


CHAIN DRIVE SYSTEM

As a bicycle is pedaled for a distance (1/4 of a block), the chain attached to the wheels’ sprocket turns the engine sprocket to start the engine. Although, less complicated than the hand lever type, it has its own serious flaws.

Often these engine kits are sold with sprockets that bolt onto the spokes of the rear wheel. Any cyclist that has ridden a bicycle knows that spokes break or loosen and rims bend, therefore, a sprocket attached to either will fail sooner or later.

CONSEQUENCES:

If the chain falls off the sprocket, jams into the spokes or loosens and slaps any body part: leg, back, neck or head, serious injury or death might occur.

If a flat tire occurs, it will cause one hell of a problem changing the tube and aligning the wheel sprocket and motor sprocket. (An expensive process to fix.)

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